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Article
August 1940

SITE OF DISTURBANCE IN ADIE'S SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(2):225-237. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870020017002
Abstract

Adie's syndrome has frequently been reported from Germany and England but rarely from this country. The entity consists essentially of tonic pupillary reactions with or without absence of tendon reflexes. As will be seen later, it manifests itself in several forms.

The so-called myotonic pupil was first described almost simultaneously in 1902 by Strasburger1 and Saenger,2 though their observations were made independently. This type of pupillary reaction, as described by these authors, consisted of very slow contraction to light and in convergence and accommodation, followed by an even slower dilation on removing the stimuli. The amplitude of the convergence reaction was normal or even excessive. The light reaction was the most sluggish, and in one of Strasburger's original cases it was absent entirely. From that time until the present, numerous articles on this pupillary disorder have appeared in the medical literature. Various names have been proposed for the

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