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Article
August 1940

VACCINAL DISCIFORM KERATITIS FOLLOWING ACCIDENTAL INOCULATION OF THE EYELID

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(2):352-356. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870020144014
Abstract

Accidental vaccinal inoculation of the eyelids is uncommon but not infrequent, judging from the number of reports in scientific publications. Involvement of the cornea is rare and is usually secondary to infection of the lids and conjunctiva. Only a few examples of a primary corneal lesion due to the vaccinia virus have been recorded, and these have occurred almost exclusively in physicians, nurses or laboratory workers whose eyes were injured or infected during the process of vaccinating patients or of preparing vaccine lymph.

The corneal lesions which result from vaccinal infection may be classified as slight subepithelial infiltrations, superficial vesicles, disciform keratitis and ulcers and pustules which may advance to perforation and its sequelae. The superficial types of corneal involvement usually heal with little or no residual opacification; the deeper forms leave scars of varying density, often with considerable impairment of vision in the affected eye.

Fuchs1 in 1901

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