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Article
September 1940

CALCIFIED CAROTID ARTERY WITH ATROPHY OF THE OPTIC NERVE, CUPPING AND LOW TENSION: REPORT OF A CASE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(3):476-478. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870030052006
Abstract

In 1932 Knapp1 reported a number of cases of atrophy of the optic nerve with excavation of the disk and especially with marginal cupping as seen in glaucoma, in which the intraocular tension was persistently low. He was not able to classify them as cases of typical glaucoma and considered "the possible presence of sclerosis of the basal vessels of the brain causing an optic atrophy by pressure." Roentgen examination in these cases showed calcification of the internal carotid, posterior communicating and ophthalmic arteries. The changes in the visual fields had a tendency toward altitudinal defects. The condition was non-progressive. In a recent publication Knapp2 reported a number of additional cases and presented the subsequent histories of some of the previously reported cases which were followed up. He came to the following conclusion : "Atheromatous carotid arteries cannot alone cause this descending atrophy, but the condition must be caused

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