[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1940

CLINICAL USE OF LACQUER IN OPHTHALMOLOGYFOR THE TREATMENT OF SQUINT, SUPPRESSION, AMBLYOPIA AND DIPLOPIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(3):479-481. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870030055007

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Lacquer may be applied to an ophthalmic lens in various ways in order to obscure the vision as much as required without an objectionable appearance. This is due to the minute refracting irregularities distributed on the surface of the lacquer as it dries. Lacquer gives the ophthalmologist an additional means of obscuring vision which has some advantages over the standard methods.

The advantages over the use of atropine in the fixing eye are as follows: 1. Distance and near vision are equally affected by the lacquer. 2. There are no allergic reactions. 3. The objectionable appearance of the dilated pupil is avoided. 4. The amount of obscuration of sight can be controlled by the application of the lacquer.

The advantages over a patch are as follows: 1. Binocular vision is stimulated rather than suppressed. 2. The lacquered lens is worn all the time, which is important in the treatment of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×