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Article
September 1940

IRIDOTORSION: CONFIRMATION OF ITS ANATOMIC BASIS BY FORTIN'S INVESTIGATIONS ON GLAUCOMA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(3):482-489. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870030058008
Abstract

In 1939 Fortin. of Buenos Aires, Argentina, published a monograph on his latest investigations on glaucoma.1 As only two hundred copies were printed, its interesting contents have remained within the reach of only a few. A good review, however, has been written by Schieck.2 Fortin had been carrying on his research work for over ten years and was able to present much new material, with many excellent photomicrographs of the ciliary body and its related structures in their relation to glaucoma and its therapy.

According to Fortin, the ciliary muscle is located in a closed cavity, which he calls the iridociliary chamber. The chamber extends anteriorly into the cavities of the iris and posteriorly into the cavities of the ciliary body. It is closed above by the sclera and below by the pigment epithelium. The iris does not contain any stroma between its two layers, but these spaces

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