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Article
September 1940

TRANSCRANIAL EXTIRPATION OF A FIBROHEMANGIOMA OF THE ORBITREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Ophthalmology PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(3):539-543. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870030117012
Abstract

Hemangioma of the orbit is considered by Benedict and Love,1 Reese2 and others to be the most common type of primary intraorbital tumor. The typical case is one in which slowly developing but variable unilateral exophthalmos occurs, usually in the first or second decade of life. Exophthalmos is usually "straight forward," and the degree of exophthalmos may increase with dependent posture of the head or with compression of the jugular vein. It is not usually pulsatile, nor is a bruit commonly heard. Vision is not significantly affected unless the tumor becomes large or is situated within the muscle cone. Limitation of ocular rotations seldom occurs. A portion of the cavernous type of angioma is sometimes present in the lid or conjunctival sac, but the fibrous type, which is usually located in the posterior portion of the orbit, may give no external evidence of its nature.

Unilateral exophthalmos is

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