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Article
November 1940

TENDON TRANSPLANTATION FOR PARALYSIS OF THE EXTERNAL RECTUS MUSCLEA FURTHER REPORT

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(5):916-923. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870050066004
Abstract

The following report was stimulated by a recent statement of Bielschowsky.1 "By transplantation," he stated, "one may obtain a decrease in the deviation and even a certain amount of abversion, but the patient will not be able to see objects in front of him single with the normal position of the head, and he will not abandon the habit of anomalous rotation of the head toward the paralyzed side." This statement from the world's greatest authority on the extraocular muscles would certainly tend to discourage the ophthalmologist who has never performed the operation from attempting it. It is for this reason that it seemed useful to review the results in a series of operations performed since my report in 1929.2 At that time previously reported cases were discussed, including those of Hummelsheim, O'Connor, Peter, Posey, Franklin and Cordes and others. Two personal cases of paralysis of the external

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