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Article
November 1940

CORNEAL OPACITIES IN THE ALASKAN ESKIMOA POSSIBLE CAUSATION

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service SAN PEDRO, CALIF.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1940;24(5):972-974. doi:10.1001/archopht.1940.00870050122009
Abstract

In the summer of 1938 I spent several months in Northwestern Alaska as a medical officer on a coast guard cutter, and as a part of my duties I saw about 800 natives with various medical complaints. The natives of the region are Eskimos and persons with a mixture of white and of Eskimo blood. The total population of the villages visited was 3,553 (which included about 100 white persons). The territory covered by the cruise included the coast line from a point 90 miles east of Nome, north as far as Barrow and the islands adjacent to the mainland.

A condition frequently found was corneal opacity, causing much individual disability. The condition was found in 57 patients, was bilateral in all, was of about equal extent in both eyes and involved large portions of the cornea. The opacities were of varying degree of density. There was no patient who

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