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Article
May 1941

EFFECTS OF SOME SILVER SALTS ON THE EYE: (SILVER NITRATE, SILVER AMMONIUM NITRATE, SILVER AMMONIUM SULFATE, SILVER AMMONIUM LACTATE AND A MIXTURE OF SILVER AMMONIUM NITRATE AND SILVER AMMONIUM SULFATE)

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Division of Pharmacology, Food and Drug Administration, Federal Security Agency.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;25(5):839-847. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870110091010
Abstract

The use of silver and its salts as therapeutic agents undoubtedly antedates the inclusion of silver nitrate in a pharmacopeia published in Rome in 69 B. C.1 The use of silver nitrate as a medicinal agent by Geber and the Mohammedan school established by him is clearly indicated.2 Since his time there have been numerous references to the employment of silver medicinally in a variety of ways, particularly by Avicenna, by Paracelsus in the middle of the sixteenth century and by many others up to the present time. In fact, a general survey indicates that there are few if any known physiologic impairments for which silver in some form has not been recommended. As a caustic, silver nitrate was apparently first used in the sixteenth century. Angelo Sala in 1614 reported the first case of clearly diagnosed generalized argyria.3 He administered silver nitrate internally, probably as a

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