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Article
May 1941

BLOOD STAINING OF THE CORNEA: Report of a Case

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;25(5):863-865. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870110117013
Abstract

Complete blood staining of the cornea presents a characteristic picture. When bleeding into the anterior chamber occurs and a hyphema forms, corneal staining may become evident in a few days, especially in conditions accompanied by increased intraocular pressure. The condition is always the result of an injury or wound and is a pathologic rarity. According to Duke-Elder,1 its rarity is explained by the fact that the intraocular tension is lowered in most instances of perforating injury. The coloring of the cornea varies from a rusty brown to a greenish black or from greenish yellow to white. The cornea may, in the beginning, be entirely stained and clears very slowly. Schousboë and Morard2 stated that its appearance may be limited to a discoid stain in the center area only. When clearing occurs it starts peripherally and travels centrally. A gray central patch may persist after a year, and it

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