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Article
August 1941

RECESSION OF RETINAL PAPILLEDEMA DURING TERMINAL STAGE OF MALIGNANT HYPERTENSIONREPORT OF A CASE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(2):240-246. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870140090004

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Abstract

Several observers have reported recession and even disappearance of the characteristic retinitis associated with malignant hypertension. Usually the improvement in the retina has been accompanied with a period of amelioration in the general condition. In our case, however, during the progressive terminal course, three weeks before death, a previously measurable papilledema disappeared and retinal hemorrhages and exudates became less numerous. Pathologic study of the retina confirmed the absence of papilledema. It seemed pertinent, therefore, to report these facts and to endeavor to offer an explanation for them.

REPORT OF CASE  The patient was 38 years old and was the father of three healthy children. On admission to the clinic (June 12, 1939) his chief complaints were severe headaches and dimness of vision. He had been told by his local physician that his blood pressure was elevated. His family history was not significant except for the fact that his sister had

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