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Article
September 1941

CHAGAS' DISEASE: THE OCULAR CONJUNCTIVA AS THE MOST FREQUENT ROUTE OF INFECTION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Surgery and Pharmacy BAHIA, BRAZIL

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(3):341-346. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870150015001
Abstract

American trypanosomiasis, called Chagas' disease in honor of its discoverer, is a tropical disease frequently encountered in certain parts of the American continents, especially Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, Venezuela, Paraguay, Bolivia, Guatemala and Panama. The organism which causes the disease is a flagellate protozoon. Carlos Chagas named the organism Schizotrypanum cruzi in honor of Oswaldo Cruz, a Brazilian scientist. Schizotrypanum cruzi is a habitual inhabitant of the Chiroptera. It is transmitted to man and animals by several Hemiptera of the Lamus genus, the best known of which are Lamus infestans and Lamus magistus, blood-sucking insects abundant in many sections of South America.

From articles recently published on the subject, it is evident that of the seventy species of blood-sucking insects of the Reduviidae family existing in America, twenty-six species are naturally infected with Schizotrypanum cruzi and four more species can be experimentally infected. The species of Lamus which infest various

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