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October 1941

ALLERGIC DERMATITIS AND CONJUNCTIVITIS FROM PAREDRINE HYDROBROMIDE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(4):585-586. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870160059004
Abstract

Allergic reactions to eye drops with resultant dermatitis and conjunctivitis are very common. They occur, for example, with atropine, which is the best known, and also with butyn, larocaine,1 nupercaine2 and other substances. As far as I know, no report has been made of an allergic reaction to paredrine hydrobromide.3

During the past two or three years paredrine hydrobromide has become fairly popular as a mydriatic, and some ophthalmologists use it in conjunction with homatropine for cycloplegia. As an aid in cycloplegia it is useless, in my opinion, but as a mydriatic, either alone or in conjunction with euphthalmine, it is excellent. I have used 1 per cent and 3 per cent paredrine hydrobromide for more than a thousand patients with no ill effects except in 1 case, which I am reporting here.

REPORT OF A CASE  L. G., 64 years old, had bilateral nuclear sclerosis of

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