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Article
November 1941

CAUSES OF BLINDNESS IN PENNSYLVANIA: AN ANALYSIS OF THE BLINDNESS IN OVER THIRTY THOUSAND EYES

Author Affiliations

Supervising Ophthalmologist, Department of Public Assistance, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Supervisor, Conservation of Vision, State Council for the Blind, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(5):797-807. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870170089007
Abstract

Since the enactment in Pennsylvania, in 1934, of legislation granting pensions to blind persons, a great number of eligible and ineligible persons have made applications for these pensions. The result is that at present we are able to analyze and tabulate the causes of blindness in the 31,352 eyes of 15,676 persons 21 years of age or over whose visual acuity was 20/200 (6/60) or less and who were therefore considered industrially blind. This is according to the definition of blindness as adopted by the Committee on Statistics of the Blind.1

At the end of the first year of the administration of the act for granting pensions for blindness a report was made based on an analysis of the causes of blindness in 11,852 eyes. This report was read before the Section on Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association in Kansas City, Mo., on May 13, 1936.2

On

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