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Article
November 1941

MODIFICATION OF THE BREWSTER STEREOSCOPE FOR CLINICAL REQUIREMENTS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Polyclinic Hospital, New York.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1941;26(5):808-815. doi:10.1001/archopht.1941.00870170100008
Abstract

The familiar Brewster stereoscope consists of a rigid tubular type of viewing head that covers the eyes and much of the face. This viewing head contains a pair of lenses that are usually decentered outward so as to permit inspection of a pair of large stereoscope pictures, each 3 by 3 inches (7.6 by 7.6 cm.), which are pasted on a single card. The viewing distance can be changed, but to a rather limited extent. In the early part of this century the entertainment value of the stereoscope in providing illusions of a third dimension gradually faded. The subsequent adaptation of the stereoscope to clinical requirements consisted in replacement of the pictures by targets that could convey some meaning as to the fusion status of the eyes.

Because of the rigid nature of this simple instrument, the information that such targets could offer was suggestive rather than conclusive, qualitative rather

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