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Article
January 1943

RELATION OF DIET TO LENTICULAR CHANGES IN LARVAE OF AMBLYSTOMA TIGRINUM

Author Affiliations

HADDONFIELD, N. J.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(1):69-84. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880130089005
Abstract

Cataracts in the tiger salamander, Amblystoma tigrinum, were first observed by me1 in the summer of 1933 in larvae raised from Illinois eggs and used in a study of the nutritional needs of this rapidly growing larval form for the formation of bone and blood. Cortical opacities (fig. 1 A) with a thin subcapsular space developed in larvae fed for a month or more a semisynthetic ration containing a high level of purified casein and a smaller amount of powdered milk. The disease did not appear in animals of the same lot fed the same ration with added cystine or in those (fig. 1 B) fed pulverized beef muscle as a source of protein in a semisynthetic diet with different combinations of the calcifying vitamin and minerals. An early stage of the opacities was seen rarely (fig. 1 C) as striations from the equator to the anterior pole. The

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