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Article
January 1943

SCLERAL DISEASE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: REPORT OF THREE CASES, IN ONE OF WHICH BOTH EYES WERE STUDIED POST MORTEM

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the service of Dr. Robert K. Lambert and the Garfunkel Memorial Eye Laboratory, Montefiore Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(1):98-108. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880130118008
Abstract

Inflammation of the sclera and of the episclera, the latter first called subconjunctivitis by von Graefe, have long been known to be associated with diseases of the articular structures of the body. Hutchinson1 in 1885, Fuchs2 in 1895 and Wagenmann3 in 1897 reported cases of gout in which episcleritis was a notable complication. Wood4 in 1936 found crystalline deposits in the sclera of a gouty patient who manifested active scleritis. As recently as 1924, Rateau5 reported an interesting case in which sclerotenonitis was the prodromal symptom of an attack of rheumatic fever.

In 1938 Verhoeff and King6 presented a case of rheumatoid arthritis in which an eye was removed because of an inflammatory perforating scleral lesion. This eye was histologically examined in great detail. These authors analyzed 14 previously recorded cases of a similar nature in which the lesion was designated by the name

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