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Article
January 1943

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ANISEIKONIA

Author Affiliations

HANOVER, N. H.
From the Dartmouth Eye Institute, Dartmouth Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(1):116-133. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880130136010
Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS  The two eyes are never identical. Between them there are always numerous discrepancies in the neuromuscular apparatus, the dioptric system and the sensorial apparatus. The discrepancies of the neuromuscular apparatus, the heterophorias, cause a faulty relative position of the eyes when fusion is suspended. The aberrations and other irregularities of the dioptric system cause faulty dioptric images, which in some cases may differ considerably in the two eyes. Furthermore, the differences in the relative position of objects in space and in their distance from the two eyes cause geometrically different images to be formed in the two eyes. The discrepancies of the sensorial apparatus are caused by a special distribution of the receptor elements.As a result of all these discrepancies and incongruities, the two ocular images1 of the visual system are different even under normal conditions. The incongruities as a rule are overcome by

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