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Article
February 1943

ROLE OF THE MEDICAL SOCIAL WORKER IN AN OPHTHALMOLOGIC SERVICE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(2):266-272. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880140112006
Abstract

Before the service of a medical social worker especially trained for work with patients in an ophthalmologic service was initiated in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, it was decided to survey the patient group for the preceding year in order to determine what kinds of patients needed social care and how the worker could best concentrate her efforts to benefit the patients and the service. This was deemed desirable because numerous studies have shown much waste of the ophthalmologist's time in the clinic through the patient's lack of understanding of his ophthalmic conditions and, therefore, a failure to carry out the plan of treatment recommended.

During the year 1940, 1,636 new patients came to the ophthalmologic clinic of the University Hospital. Of these every third patient was chosen for the study, making a total of 599. A large sample was taken in this way because it would cover

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