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Article
May 1943

OPTOCHIASMIC ARACHNOIDITIS: REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Milwaukee County Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(5):818-825. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880170138013
Abstract

Although chronic arachnoiditis involving the spinal cord was described by Spiller, Musser and Martin1 in 1903 and by Horsley2 in 1909, the possibility that arachnoiditis might affect the optic nerves and chiasm has only recently attracted the attention of ophthalmologists. Despite excellent descriptions of optochiasmic arachnoiditis by Heurer and Vail,3 Craig and Lillie,4 Vail5 and Lillie,6 there are still too few ophthalmologists who recognize the importance of the disease, its dire consequences to vision if not diagnosed or suspected and the excellent results that may be obtained by surgical intervention.

Doubtless some of the apathy may be attributed to a misconception of the symptoms and signs of the disease. Visual loss and headache are in the great majority of cases the only symptoms complained of. The visual loss may be in one eye or in both. It may be more advanced in one eye

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