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Article
June 1943

MICROPSIA AND TELEOPSIA LIMITED TO THE TEMPORAL FIELDS OF VISION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Neurologic Service of Dr. I. S. Wechsler, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(6):904-908. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880180054003
Abstract

Micropsia, teleopsia and metamorphopsia are known to occur with lesions in the brain.1 These visual disturbances are usually attributed to disease of the cortex of the occipital lobe. However, they may exist in patients with lesions in the optic pathways anterior to the lateral geniculate bodies. Wilbrand and Sänger2 pointed out that sometimes metamorphopsia and micropsia precede the formation of absolute scotomas in cases of retinal lesions. They considered these conditions as retinal metamorphopsia and micropsia.

Recently we encountered unusual visual symptoms in a patient with a verified tumor of the chiasmal region. The bitemporal field defects were incomplete. There were spotty asymmetric scotomas with islands of micropsia and of teleopsia limited to the temporal halves of the fields of vision.

A. W., a butcher aged 35, entered the hospital Feb. 10, 1942 with chief complaints of headache and blurred vision. In 1940 he had had headaches, diminution

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