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Article
June 1943

RIBOFLAVIN FOR ROSACEA KERATITIS, MARGINAL CORNEAL ULCERS AND CATARRHAL CORNEAL INFILTRATES: LABORATORY AND CLINICAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the University Hospitals of Cleveland, Department of Surgery, Ophthalmologic Service.
Research Fellow in Biochemistry (assigned to ophthalmology).
S. M. A. Corporation Fellow in Ophthalmologic Chemistry.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(6):956-967. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880180106009
Abstract

The term rosacea keratitis was long ago applied to a condition frequently observed in patients having acne rosacea. This condition is characterized by the presence of one or more small peripheral infiltrates, between which and the limbus a number of small capillaries appear, progressing almost to, but not quite touching, the infiltrates. It was popularized by Doggart,1 and his descriptions and illustrations of the advanced pathologic changes have caused many ophthalmologists to consider only the advanced stage as "rosacea keratitis." It has long been observed that Negroes and other patients without dermatologic acne rosacea may have severe lesions. In fact, the incidence without acne rosacea is so much greater that the occurrence with it is now considered almost a coincidence, although in general the lesions accompanying acne rosacea are of greater severity and without the aid of riboflavin are much more destructive of the visual function.

Much smaller infiltrates,

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