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Article
June 1943

SULFONAMIDE COMPOUNDS IN TREATMENT OF OCULAR INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;29(6):1000-1022. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880180150015
Abstract

Since 1937 the sulfonamide compounds have been employed with success in the treatment of an increasing number of ocular infections, and an extensive literature has already accumulated in the few years since their introduction. In the present review I have attempted to summarize the significant literature and to evaluate in the light of available laboratory studies and personal experience the sometimes conflicting clinical results reported.

SULFONAMIDE COMPOUNDS AVAILABLE FOR CLINICAL USE  Since the introduction of the original prontosil by Domagk1 in 1935, a large number of related compounds have been tested experimentally, but only a few have been found suitable for clinical use. In the United States only azosulfamide, sulfanilamide, sulfapyridine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-pyridine), sulfathiazole (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-thiazole) and sulfadiazine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido]-pyrimidine) have come into general use in the treatment of ocular infections. Of these, azosulfamide and sulfapyridine have now been virtually discarded, the former because it is believed to have no action other

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