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Article
September 1943

BILATERAL UVEITIS, POLIOSIS AND RETINAL DETACHMENT WITH RECOVERY: REPORT OF A CASE

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;30(3):331-337. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880210055005
Abstract

Harada,1 in 1926, first described bilateral detachment of the retina in the course of low grade uveitis as an independent disease. The typical onset of an acute diffuse exudative choroiditis or uveitis accompanied by poliosis, and sometimes alopecia and deafness, with a relatively favorable prognosis for spontaneous retinal reattachment, warrants consideration of this disease as an entity. It is invariably bilateral. The onset is acute, is accompanied by headache and occasional vomiting or nausea and is characterized by low grade inflammatory symptoms in the anterior segment of the uvea. In the early stage opacities of the vitreous and edema of the disk suggestive of papillitis are present ; these are followed by an extensive detachment. The detachment has a definite tendency to disappear within a few weeks, and the healing results in good visual acuity. The fundi show much depigmentation, and in the periphery white patches suggestive of sympathetic choroiditis

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