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Article
October 1943

A NEW ANSWER TO THE QUESTION OF MACULAR SPARING

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;30(4):421-425. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880220013001
Abstract

According to ordinary field tests, the central visual field is usually spared to a considerable extent when one occipital lobe has been removed or its functions completely destroyed, while the central field is characteristically split vertically when one optic tract is destroyed. If there is actual sparing of the macula in the former case, there seems to be no escape from the conclusion that bilateral representation of the macula exists in the occipital lobes. There is, however, no tenable anatomic evidence in favor of this and in fact much against it.1 Assumption that the supposed sparing is due to instability of fixation fails to solve the enigma because it does not explain why such sparing is not found when one optic tract is destroyed. The theory that I have to offer explains macular sparing after complete destruction of one occipital lobe as only apparent and as due partly to

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