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Article
December 1943

PLASTIC SHELL FOR USE IN THE SIMPLE EVISCERATION OF THE GLOBE

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1943;30(6):775-776. doi:10.1001/archopht.1943.00880240093010
Abstract

After many years of experience with Harold Gifford's method of simple evisceration of the globe, the only disadvantage which I have noted, when proper indications are observed, is the occurrence of conjunctival chemosis. It will be remembered that the operation consists in an incision across the cornea and into the sclera at each side, removal of the ocular contents by an evisceration spoon and careful wiping of the inside of the scleral shell with sponges to remove all uveal tissue. The entire cornea is retained. No sutures need be employed, or, at most, one suture between the lips of the corneal wound to keep them from overlapping during the healing process may be used. No implant is employed. The normal attachments of the conjunctiva are not disturbed, and, as a result of the trauma of evisceration, fluid tends to collect within and beneath the conjunctiva. This chemosis may be severe,

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