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Article
January 1945

DIBUTOLINE SULFATE: A NEW MYDRIATIC AND CYCLOPLEGIC DRUG

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY
From the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;33(1):16-22. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890130030004
Abstract

There has been need in ophthalmology for new mydriatic and cycloplegic drugs. Hypersensitivity and idiosyncrasies to atropine and its derivatives are not uncommon. Also, the dosage of the more potent members of the group is limited by undesirable systemic effects, e. g., excitation and depression of the central nervous system, flushed face and drying of secretions. Finally, the ocular effects of atropine and scopolamine are unduly prolonged and are not readily counteracted. Recently we have synthesized the first substitutes for the atropine series effective on the eye.1 The new mydriatic and cycloplegic drugs are surface active carbamic acid esters of the choline type and, therefore, are chemically unrelated to atropine. The ocular effects of the first of the new class of drugs have been reported previously.2 Herein are described the ocular pharmacologic effects and some clinical applications of dibutoline, a name for the latest and most effective member

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