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Article
March 1945

FACTORS AFFECTING HEMORRHAGE FOLLOWING EXTRACTIONS OF CATARACTS

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;33(3):192-198. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890150036004
Abstract

The problem of hemorrhage into the anterior chamber of the eye after the removal of a cataract has always been a disturbing one to ophthalmologists because the hemorrhage prolongs convalescence, it may lead to other complications and occasionally it results in limitation of vision. This problem has been baffling because it has been difficult to ascertain the cause of the hemorrhage.

Many papers dealing with various aspects of the problem have appeared, but three are outstanding among the earlier publications. Between 1869 and 1897 Herman Knapp1 reported about 2,000 cases. He concluded that trauma accounts for the hemorrhage in a large number of cases but that in many others the cause is unknown.

In 1916 Wheeler2 reviewed the literature thoroughly and also reported results for a total of 2,123 operations which had been done by various members of the staff of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary

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