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Article
May 1945

OPHTHALMOLOGIC FEATURES OF INTRACRANIAL CHORDOMA AND ALLIED TUMORS OF THE CLIVUS

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;33(5):397-403. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890170073009
Abstract

Intracranial chordoma and allied tumors of the clivus are of significance to the ophthalmologist, who may be the first to see the patient, since diplopia and visual disturbances occur in over a third of the cases and may, together with headache, be the only symptoms. In 1 case reported in the literature1 muscle exercises were given before the true nature of the lesion was determined. The age incidence and the sequence of the symptoms may suggest that the tumor is chordoma, a diagnosis which can be further verified by roentgenographic and encephalographic studies.

That this suspicion may be of value to the neurosurgeon is easily understandable when it is realized (1) that tumors of this type are almost invariably fatal if left alone and (2) that surgical intervention in selected cases offers the only hope. If the surgeon suspects chordoma, he should not attempt complete removal but, rather, should

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