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Article
June 1945

PARINAUD'S OCULOGLANDULAR SYNDROME DUE TO A YEASTLIKE ORGANISM

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;33(6):471-475. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890180069007
Abstract

At the present time it is well established that what was first known as Parinaud's conjunctivitis, after its description by that author in 1889, is not a definite disease with specific pathologic and bacteriologic characteristics, but is in reality a symptom complex which can be caused by a number of etiologic factors. For that reason the term "Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome,"1 for a chronic uniocular granulomatous conjunctivitis with regional lymphadenitis, appears most appropriate. Tularemia, tuberculosis, an unidentified virus infection, lymphogranuloma venereum, syphilis and even infections with the hemolytic staphylococcus and Bacillus proteus,2 have been listed as causes of the condition. But by far the most common agent appears to be the leptothrix, first found in pathologic sections by Verhoeff, in 19133 and later obtained in cultures of conjunctival material by Verhoeff and King, in 1933.4 Others have confirmed these observations and have also demonstrated the organism in

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