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Article
September 1945

VITAMIN C SATURATION AND SENILE CATARACT

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.
From the Ophthalmic Department and Laboratory of the Newark Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;34(3):202-209. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890190202005
Abstract

Vitamin C (C6H8O6) is readily soluble in water and alcohol and insoluble in ether and benzene and has a molecular weight of 176. Fehling's solution is reduced in cold by vitamin C, as is silver nitrate, permanganate and iodide. Von Szent-Györgyi produced vitamin C in 1932 and named it hexuronic acid, without being aware of its true identity. The final identification was made by Tillmans. Vitamin C is characterized by a high redox potential, which is strongly negative. The reduced form of vitamin C activates ferments and inactivates the oxidized form of the same. This vitamin is readily destroyed by oxidation and is a strong reducing agent in itself. Important organs containing ascorbic acid are the adrenals, the lens, the corpus luteum, the brain, the hypophysis, the pancreas, the aqueous and, in lesser amounts, the vitreous. In the blood 8 to 12 mg. per thousand

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