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Article
November 1945

FOSTER KENNEDY SYNDROME WITH POST-TRAUMATIC ARACHNOIDITIS OF OPTIC CHIASM AND BASE OF FRONTAL LOBES

Arch Ophthalmol. 1945;34(5):399-401. doi:10.1001/archopht.1945.00890190401008
Abstract

The syndrome of atrophy of the optic nerve of one eye and papilledema in the other eye has come to be regarded as evidence of a tumor lying at the base of the frontal lobe. This relation was first pointed out by Paton1 (1909) and was further elaborated on by Foster Kennedy2 (1911). Recent studies have indicated that the syndrome may be found at times in association with arteriosclerosis of the internal carotid arteries, which compress the optic nerves and chiasm.3 Recognition of this observation has tended to indicate that the Foster Kennedy syndrome is found at times in conjunction with disorders other than tumor and has led to elaboration of the conditions under which the syndrome may occur. Experience with a recent case indicates that it may develop also as a result of arachnoiditis in the region of the optic nerves and optic chiasm.

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