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Article
January 1946

CLINICAL STUDY OF EFFECT OF TOBACCO ON THE NORMAL ANGIOSCOTOMA

Author Affiliations

Assistant Resident in Ophthalmology, Long Island College Hospital BROOKLYN
From the Department of Ophthalmology of the Long Island College of Medicine and the Long Island College Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(1):15-19. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200019003
Abstract

In 1926 the classic form of the angioscotoma was first described.1 This work has been a source of aid to clinicians investigating disease of the nasal accessory sinuses,2 forms of edema,3 glaucoma4 and menstrual disturbances.5 The research worker, too, has had recourse to angioscotometry in studying the effects of sulfanilamide,6 inhalation of oxygen,7 and amphetamine sulfate,8 and studies of the effects on the visual fields of high altitude9 have been a basis of investigations in World War II. No effort has been made, however, to determine the effect of smoking on the normal angioscotoma. Since tobacco smoking is so widespread, it was thought that knowledge of its effect might be of clinical and experimental value. It was therefore decided to study the effect on the central visual fields of smoking 1 cigaret with inhalation.

METHODS AND MATERIAL  Angioscotometry was the method

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