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Article
February 1946

RETURN OF VISION IN TRANSPLANTED ADULT SALAMANDER EYES AFTER SEVEN DAYS OF REFRIGERATION

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Anatomy, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Osborn Zoological Laboratory, Yale University.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(2):135-144. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200140006
Abstract

NUMEROUS larvae and adults, have shown that when the eye is grafted in the orbit immediately after it has been excised the transplant in most cases eventually recovers its visual function (Stone and associates1). In some of these experiments eyes of animals of different species were exchanged. The success of the experiments, indicated by return of vision, was due not only to an early revascularization of the grafted eye and the preservation of its essential tissues but to the capacity of regeneration possessed by these eyes.

However, the picture of regeneration in the grafted eyes of larvae was quite different from that in the transplanted eyes of adults. In the larvae (Stone1a; Stone, Ussher and Beers1b) all the parts of the grafted eye survive except for occasional loss of a few ganglion cells in the retina. The optic nerve could therefore regenerate rather rapidly from the severed

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