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Article
March 1946

PARALYSIS OF CONVERGENCE WITH BILATERAL RING SCOTOMA FOLLOWING INJURY TO OCCIPITAL REGION

Author Affiliations

JERUSALEM, PALESTINE
From the Ophthalmological Department of the Hadassah University Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(3):218-226. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200224002
Abstract

REPORT OF A CASE  S. A., a Palestinian Jew 22 years of age, presented himself for the first time in the outpatient department of the Hadassah University Hospital on Nov. 14, 1944, complaining of diplopia for near and distant objects, headaches, sensation of pressure in the head, frequent attacks of dizziness, loss of equilibrium while bending forward and weakened memory.

History.  —There was nothing of importance in his family history. Except for scarlet fever, angina and pneumonia in childhood and, at the age of 20, malaria and a slight injury to his left arm caused by bomb splinters while he was serving with the armed forces, he had had no disease which could be connected with his present condition. At the age of 19, in 1941, he joined the British army as a sapper. In October 1942, while working in a well at a depth of 40 meters, he was

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