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Article
March 1946

HYPERPYREXIA IN TREATMENT OF OCULAR CONDITIONS DUE TO SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, United States Public Health Service; Assistant Surgeon (R) United States Public Health Service NEW ORLEANS, LA.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(3):271-279. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200277006
Abstract

The induction of fever has been used by ophthalmologists in the treatment of various ocular conditions for many years. According to Cordes,1 the usual methods of fever therapy applicable to ophthalmology include:

  1. Parenteral and intramuscular injections of foreign proteins

    1. Native proteins (milk)

      1. Caseins (Yatren-Casein, Caseosan, Alobintin, Perprotasin and Aolan)

      2. Egg albumin

    2. Protein split products (peptone-albumose, proteoses, pepsin)

    3. Tissue extracts (bovine uveal pigment)

    4. Serums (serums of Roux and Behring, Deutschmann's yeast serum, auto serum, normal horse serum and antitoxins)

    5. Vaccines—mainly typhoid

    6. Typhoid antigen

    7. Bacterial extracts (Coley's mixed toxins, Omnadin)

  2. Malarial therapy

  3. Physical means

    1. High frequency methods

      1. Diathermy

      2. Radiothermy (short wave)

      3. Inductothermy

    2. Kettering Hypertherm

To these Castleden2 would add the external production of heat (by hot water baths, steam baths and blanketing) and the use of drugs (such as injections of sulfur or tetrahydrobetanaphthylamine).

The beneficial results observed clinically in response to properly controlled fever therapy have been attributed to

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