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Article
March 1946

SEESAW NYSTAGMUS ASSOCIATED WITH CHOROIDITIS AND POSITIVE NEUTRALIZATION TEST FOR TOXOPLASMA

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Ophthalmology, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(3):301-302. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200307010
Abstract

NYSTAGMUS in which one eye turns rhythmically up and down while its fellow moves contrarily, in the nature of a seesaw, is strange and rare. The only case that I have been able to find in the literature is one reported in 1914 by Maddox.1 In this report no mention was made of the site of the lesion or of its possible cause. In the case to be reported here there is likewise no evidence as to the site of the lesion, nor is the causative agent proved although a possible etiologic factor suggests itself.

REPORT OF A CASE  A white man, aged 51 came to the Mayo Clinic on Oct. 11, 1944, complaining of loss of vision. His occupation had been that of attendant at a service station for automobiles. He had been myopic since childhood and had worn glasses for thirty years.His present difficulty began four

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