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Article
April 1946

MEDICAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE GLAUCOMA

Author Affiliations

MÉXICO, D. F., MEXICO

Arch Ophthalmol. 1946;35(4):361-365. doi:10.1001/archopht.1946.00890200368004
Abstract

It is certainly a curious, but explicable, fact that by living constantly in the presence of a difficulty man becomes less apt to overcome it.—Prof. Dr. Charles Nicolle.1

SELDOM do oculists encounter in the exercise of their profession a more dramatic scene than that of an acute attack of glaucoma.

Within a few minutes, sometimes quite suddenly, the patient is stricken with violent pain in one eye, pain which radiates toward the ear, teeth and all over the head and may reach an intolerable pitch. He loses sleep and appetite and frequently is subject to nausea, or even vomiting, and fever. Sometimes, owing to the intensity of the pain, he loses consciousness. At the same time the visual power fails rapidly and in some cases disappears completely in a few hours. In other cases the patient perceives lights as though through fog and surrounded by rainbow-colored rings.

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