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Article
December 1950

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE POSTOPERATIVE RESULTS IN CONCOMITANT CONVERGENT STRABISMUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Institute of Ophthalmology of Presbyterian Hospital, and the Department of Ophthalmology of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;44(6):813-822. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910020826004
Abstract

IT IS UNDERSTANDABLE that the results of the surgical treatment of concomitant convergent strabismus are variable, for, as pointed out by Lancaster,1 "Operation is a vicarious remedy. It does not cure by removing the cause but by substituting a different set of conditions with which the physiologic mechanism must work." Being in complete accord with this statement, we thought that an evaluation of end results could best be accomplished by an analysis of 79 cases of surgically treated concomitant convergent strabismus. All the patients in this series have been followed for at least seven years since operation, for it was felt that any shorter period was inadequate for an accurate determination of the final outcome. Since the number of cases is too small to permit statistical analysis, percentages are given only when they are of real significance. We shall point out some important steps in the preoperative examination and

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