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Article
July 1953

MINIMAL AMOUNT OF X-RAY EXPOSURE CAUSING LENS OPACITIES IN THE HUMAN EYE

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(1):30-34. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030033005
Abstract

CURRENT events have focused attention on the ocular effects of radiation, and prime interest has centered about cataract production. A considerable amount of experimental work has shown that x-radiation of less than 250 r (200 to 1,000 kv.) can cause lens opacities in animals1 and that the younger the subject the greater the susceptibility. There is, further, evidence of a species variation by a factor of 2 to 3. The susceptibility of man is, of course, much more difficult to ascertain, and reliable data on this all-important aspect are limited to a few isolated instances. Our aim in the present study was to contact and examine as many persons as possible whose eyes had been exposed to a known amount of x-radiation and to determine thereby the least exposure which could cause an opacification of the lens that was visible with the ophthalmoscope or the slit-lamp biomicroscope.

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