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Article
July 1953

CONGENITAL STATIONARY NIGHT BLINDNESS WITHOUT OPHTHALMOSCOPIC OR OTHER ABNORMALITIES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital (Dr. Carroll), and the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals (Dr. Haig).

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1953;50(1):35-44. doi:10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030038006
Abstract

PRIMARY chorioretinal aberrations with night blindness was the subject of a symposium1 at the 1949 meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. The first abnormality considered in that symposium, and the subject of this paper, was characterized by one of us (F. D. C.) as night blindness present at birth, stationary, occurring in an approximately equal number of males and females, and with no associated abnormalities. Bell2 collected 19 pedigrees of this disease.3 A few sporadic cases have probably been encountered in the examination of candidates for the air force in this country4 and in Canada,5 and Langdon,6 in 1915, reported the cases of a father and daughter in Philadelphia who had a reduced light sense and normal fundi. Except for Langdon's observation, however, we believe that the following report is the first to record a family affected typically with this abnormality

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