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Article
November 1958

Problems in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lens-Induced Uveitis and Glaucoma

Author Affiliations

Boston
From the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. Arthur J. Bedell Lecture, Wills Eye Hospital, Feb. 22, 1958.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1958;60(5):828-841. doi:10.1001/archopht.1958.00940080848004
Abstract

The capsule of the lens is normally an effective barrier to the escape of lens protein into the eye. Under certain circumstances, however, lens matter is found outside the capsular barrier.

Thus, in certain hypermature cataracts the lens may appear to be grossly intact but lens matter appears clinically to have escaped through the capsule. After extracapsular extraction or after trauma to the lens capsule, lens matter is freely exposed to the intraocular fluids. Hypermature cataracts have been known to shrink and eventually absorb without causing any inflammatory response in the eye. Likewise, in the majority of cases of extracapsular extraction residual lens cortex absorbs without the occurrence of any undue reaction. In some cases a mild inflammatory response occurs which subsides when the lens cortex is absorbed.

In the occasional case, however, exposure of free lens matter to the intraocular fluids evokes an inflammatory response of great severity, so

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