Effect of Peripapillary Vitreous Opacity on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement Using Optical Coherence Tomography | Ophthalmology | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA Network
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Small Case Series
June 2012

Effect of Peripapillary Vitreous Opacity on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement Using Optical Coherence Tomography

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Ophthalmology, Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Dr Hwang), and Department of Ophthalmology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Dr Kim), Korea. Dr Hwang is now with the Department of Ophthalmology, Konyang University, Kim's Eye Hospital, Myung-Gok Eye Research Institute, Seoul.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2012;130(6):789-792. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.2517

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a widely used technique for the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness. It emits a light from the light source to the retina or reference mirror and measures RNFL thickness by detecting the different reflectivities of retinal structures.1 Therefore, any media opacity in the cornea, lens, or vitreous body can affect OCT measurement. However, little is known about the effect of vitreous opacity on RNFL thickness measurement. Vitreous opacity associated with age-related posterior vitreous detachment is a commonly found abnormality.2,3 In aged eyes with posterior vitreous detachment, a vitreous opacity can float around the optic disc and can affect peripapillary RNFL measurement. We report 3 cases of peripapillary vitreous opacities with or without RNFL thickness change in eyes with ocular hypertension or glaucoma.

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