Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity and Diabetic Retinopathy in the United States | Diabetic Retinopathy | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA Network
[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.237.138.69. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Research Letter
August 2014

Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity and Diabetic Retinopathy in the United States

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Exercise Science, Bellarmine University, Louisville, Kentucky
  • 2School of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
  • 3Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(8):1017-1019. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.402

Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and blood pressure currently represent the only reversible risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy.1 Physical activity (PA) is another potential modifiable risk factor for preventing diabetic ocular complications, although studies investigating this association have produced conflicting results.2 These studies have relied exclusively on self-report to quantify PA, which is prone to considerable error. Herein, we assess whether accelerometer-defined PA is associated with more advanced retinopathy independent of HbA1c level and blood pressure in a nationally representative sample of patients with diabetes mellitus.

Data from the 2005 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. All study procedures were approved by the National Center for Health Statistics review board, and all participants provided written informed consent.

×