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In This Issue of JAMA Ophthalmology
October 2019

Highlights

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137(10):1099. doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.4793
Research

Lim and coauthors evaluated the association of type 2 diabetes with longitudinal changes in peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in a study of 101 patients. Progressive reduction of peripapillary RNFL thickness was observed in healthy controls and patients with and without diabetic retinopathy; however, type 2 diabetes was associated with a greater loss of peripapillary RNFL, regardless of whether diabetic retinopathy was present. The findings suggest that peripapillary RNFL may occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes even in the absence of diabetic retinopathy progression.

Invited Commentary

Strauss and coauthors evaluate the growth rate of atrophic lesions in patients with Stargardt disease. In a cohort study, the mean progression of definitely decreased autofluorescence (AF) lesions was 0.76 mm2 per year, while the mean progression of the area of total decreased fundus AF was 0.64 mm2 per year. Rates of progression depended on initial lesion size. The findings suggested that the growth rate of atrophic lesions as determined by fundus AF may be a suitable outcome measure of treatment trials for patients with Stargardt disease.

Invited Commentary

Audio Author Interview

Hwang and coauthors evaluate whether yellow-lens night-driving glasses are associated with increases in nighttime road visibility and reductions in headlight glare from oncoming vehicles. In a cohort study of 22 individuals, yellow-lens night-driving glasses did not appear to improve pedestrian detection at night or reduce the negative association between headlight glare and pedestrian detection performance. A difference in detection with the yellow lenses was not noted based on pedestrian shirt color. The findings do not appear to support having eye care professionals advise patients to use yellow-lens night-driving glasses.

Invited Commentary

Continuing Medical Education

Gruener and coauthors investigate the incidence of giant cell arteritis in black patients compared with that in white patients. In a cohort study from a US tertiary care center that included 586 patients who underwent temporal artery biopsy, the age- and sex-adjusted annual incidence rates of biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis in patients 50 years and older were 3.1 and 3.6 per 100 000 for black and white patients, respectively. An overall incidence rate ratio of 1.2 between races was not significant. These results suggest that giant cell arteritis occurs at a similar rate in black and white patients.

Invited Commentary

Continuing Medical Education

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