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Laboratory Sciences
December 1999

Application of a Newly Developed, Highly Sensitive Camera and a 3-Dimensional High-Definition Television System in Experimental Ophthalmic Surgeries

Author Affiliations

From the Shohzankai Medical Foundation, Miyake Eye Hospital (Drs K. Miyake, Ota, and S. Miyake), Nagoya, Japan, and the Nippon Hoso Kyokai Science and Technical Research Laboratories (Dr Tanioka and Dr Kubota) and Engineering Services, Inc (Dr Mochizuki), Japan Broadcasting Corporation, Tokyo.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1999;117(12):1623-1629. doi:10.1001/archopht.117.12.1623
Abstract

Objective  To apply a new television system, which displays highly sensitive, high-quality 3-dimensional (3-D) images, in performing experimental ophthalmic surgeries.

Methods  By combining a high-gain avalanche rushing–amorphous photoconductor (HARP) camera, recently developed in Japan, which has 600 times greater sensitivity than conventional television cameras, and a single-camera, 3-D high-definition television system, which displays high-quality 3-D images, we performed cataract/intraocular lens surgeries and pars plana vitrectomies under various illumination intensities in pig cadaver eyes.

Results  Cataract/intraocular lens surgeries were performed using 7.3% the intensity of ordinary surgical microscopic illumination; vitrectomies were performed using 30.2% the intensity of an ordinary endoillumination probe with the HARP camera and by observing the stereoscopic display of the single-camera 3-D high-definition television system. Images identical to those observed by the surgeon were displayed on the stereoscopic display monitor.

Conclusion  The system not only allowed surgeries to be performed under lower intensities of operating light but also provided real-time, highly sensitive 3-D images identical to those observed by the surgeon; thus, the device may be effectively used for education, team surgery, and telesurgery.

Clinical Relevance  The new television system for ocular surgeries to be performed under lower intensities of operating light as well as providing real-time, highly sensitive 3-D images identical to those observed by the surgeon may be effectively used for education and telesurgery.

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