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Clinical Sciences
July 2003

The Ability of Periorbitally Applied Antiglare Products to Improve Contrast Sensitivity in Conditions of Sunlight Exposure

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. The authors have no commercial, proprietary, or financial interest in any product or company mentioned in the study. They received no payment of any type as consultants, reviewers, or evaluators for any product, company, or competing product affiliated with the subject matter of this study.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2003;121(7):997-1001. doi:10.1001/archopht.121.7.997
Abstract

Background  Sun glare decreases athletes' contrast sensitivity and impairs their ability to distinguish objects from background. Many commercial products claim to reduce glare but have not been proven effective in clinical studies.

Objective  To determine whether glare-reducing products such as eye black grease and antiglare stickers reduce glare and improve contrast sensitivity during sunlight exposure.

Design and Methods  We tested 46 subjects for contrast sensitivity using a Pelli-Robson contrast chart. Each subject served as an internal control and then was randomized to either application of eye black grease, antiglare stickers, or petroleum jelly at the infraorbital rim. All testing was performed in conditions of unobstructed sunlight.

Results  Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between eye black grease (mean ± SD, Pelli-Robson value, 1.87 ± 0.09 log MAR units) and antiglare stickers (1.75 ± 0.14 log MAR units) in binocular testing(P = .02). No statistical difference was found between the groups in right eyes, left eyes, or in combined data from the right and left eyes. Paired t tests demonstrated a significant difference between control (mean ± SD, 1.77 ± 0.14 log MAR units) and eye black grease (1.87 ± 0.09 log MAR units) in binocular testing(P = .04). There was also a significant difference between control (mean ± SD, 1.65 ± 0.05 log MAR units) and eye black grease (1.67 ± 0.06 log MAR units) in combined data from the right and left eyes (P = .02).

Conclusion  Eye black grease reduces glare and improves contrast sensitivity in conditions of sunlight exposure compared with the control and antiglare stickers in binocular testing.

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