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Article
March 1926

MALINGERING DEAFNESS: TESTS IN ITS DETECTION AND REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

Adjunct Laryngologist and Otologist, Gouverneur Hospital; Chief of Clinic, Otolaryngological Department, Beth Israel Hospital NEW YORK
From the Oto-Laryngological Department of Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1926;3(3):237-241. doi:10.1001/archotol.1926.00580010259003
Abstract

Pretended deafness often is difficult to detect. This condition commonly arises after injuries, the complaint of deafness and vertigo persisting long after all other signs of the accident have disappeared. If these patients are seen at an early date, malingering can readily be detected by the various tests at our disposal. Often after an accident the malingerer will exaggerate preexisting ear trouble without any physical basis for complaint. If the examination is made soon enough, a traumatic drum rupture can be ascertained easily.

The success in detecting deafness malingering depends on :

  1. 1. How soon after an accident the symptoms were complained of.

  2. 2. The symptoms (unconsciousness, vertigo, vomiting).

  3. 3. When the symptoms were noted by a physician.

  4. 4. By the variation in the patient's story.

Deafness of long duration can be recognized easily from the tone of the voice. These sufferers usually have the characteristic monotone of

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