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Article
April 1926

AN UNUSUAL CASE OF TUMOR OF THE EUSTACHIAN TUBE

Author Affiliations

LONDON, ONT.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1926;3(4):363. doi:10.1001/archotol.1926.00580010389008

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Abstract

Mrs. M., aged 65, consulted me in regard to tinnitus and poor hearing in the right ear.

On examination of the ear, the drum was negative except for slight sclerosis of the membrane. The nose and throat were negative, until on inserting the nasopharyngoscope, I observed the mouth of the right eustachian tube to be filled with a pearly tumor, extending about one-quarter inch into the nasopharynx. That it did not completely occlude the tube was demonstrated by the fact that the eustachian catheter could be passed all around it, and air on inflation entered the tympanum.

Tumor which was removed from the eustachian tube.

The removal of the growth, which more or less resembled a miniature turnip, was no easy task, but after a number of unsuccessful attempts, by means of a postnasal forceps steadying the growth, a loop of nasal snare wire was passed over the head

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