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Article
December 1927

RETROBULBAR NEURITIS AND INFECTION OF THE ACCESSORY NASAL SINUSES

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University Medical Department.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1927;6(6):503-525. doi:10.1001/archotol.1927.00610010531001

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Abstract

Acute neuritis of the optic nerve may be due to any one of the following conditions: (1) syphilis; (2) tuberculosis; (3) the acute infectious diseases—including erysipelas, mumps, influenza, tonsillitis, measles, pneumonia and malaria; (4) toxic conditions—caused by disease of the kidneys, extensive skin burns, methyl alcohol, the excessive or long continued use of quinine, salicylates, iodoform, arsenic, tobacco, ethyl hydrocuprein and, rarely, carbon monoxide; (5) multiple sclerosis; (6) infection of the accessory nasal sinuses. In each of these conditions there is a stage in which the inflammatory process may be confined to the optic nerve posterior to its entrance into the eye, and little may be learned from inspection of the eyegrounds. Later, the changes in the papillomacular bundle may cause a wedged-shaped area of pallor on the temporal side of the disk.

The nerve fibers and interstitial connective tissue that make up the papillomacular bundle are the parts of

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